Posts Tagged ‘Irish Setters’

Red Golden Retrievers – Golden’s With an Active Lifestyle


Red Golden Retrievers – Golden’s With an Active Lifestyle
By Ewen Vile

Judges may not be in favor of Red Golden Retrievers inside the show ring, but there are a lot of other reasons why you should prefer the red dog.

Red Golden Retrievers are more common in the United States and more preferred, rather than its English counterpart which are lighter and sometimes nearly white in shade. The breed is just the same, they are just commonly referred to as American Golden Retrievers and English Golden Retrievers. They differ in color, built and vigor.

American Golden Retrievers are darker in shade, from a rich Golden to liver color, mahogany, auburn and sometimes as red as the Irish Setters. It may be undesirable as stated in the standard, but it doesn’t mean an automatic disqualification. It’s just that light colored or colors within the range of gold are more acceptable when it comes to breed show or conformation competitions and titles.

Red “Goldens” are more agile, strong and robust compared to English “Goldens”. This is because of their lighter, thinner and lankier build which commonly characterizes the traditional hunting dogs. That is why they are more popular gun dogs which can retrieve fowl in the forest and even in raging waters. It can also be noted that most of the hunting dogs used by British gentlemen in the late 1800s are dark golden in shade.

Aside from great hunting dogs, they also excel in canine sports. Their light weight, balance and alertness enable them to finish agility obstacles with great accuracy in no time. They are highly trainable dogs qualified to compete in dock jumping, fly ball, Frisbee and heel work.

They are born entertainers too. They can learn tricks and commands faster than other breeds.

The breed with a darker shade are also popular service dogs. Their build, strength, energy and alertness matches their loyalty, intelligence and eager-to-please attitude. This makes them effective companion dogs, disability assistance dogs as well as search and rescue dogs. They can break through bushes, forests, marshes, avalanche and other disaster sites.

They are gifted swimmers not minding the rough cold waters. They have a water resistant and dark colored coat which does not easily get dirty compared to white “Goldens”. Their less angulated structure gives them good forequarter and hind strength.

They may be underestimated when it comes to looks, but when it comes to service, loyalty and energy, the Red Golden Retriever stands out.

For video and reading about what Golden Retrievers get up to, and for more tips on buying a Golden Retriever, go to http://www.goldenretriever1.com/

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Red Golden Retrievers – Are They Really Goldens?


Red Golden Retrievers – Are They Really Goldens?
By Ewen Vile

Traditional hunting dogs that Lord Tweedmouth created in his breeding program appeared more mahogany, sometimes auburn and almost red in color. But do Red Golden Retrievers really characterize the breed?

During the 1800s, Tweed Water Spaniels were popular hunting dogs. However they can only locate wild birds and cannot retrieve them because of their small size and light coat. This is one of the main reasons why the gentlemen hunters preferred a medium sized hunting dog.

They wanted one that can retrieve fowl well in the wild and even in rough waters. Apart from extreme hunting skills, they also wanted one that looks sturdy and gorgeous at work with a coat preferably of darker shade.

Starting rom a yellow wavy coated Retriever bred with a Tweed Water Spaniel, brought four yellow pups, Tweedmouth also experimented mating the yellow colored pups to a Red Setter and black wavy-coated Retriever and liver colored flat-coated Retriever. The breeding line brought about different shades of gold, from light yellow gold to a rich and lustrous reddish brown and liver color.

But what does the AKC Standard say about the coat? It says, “Rich, lustrous Golden of various shades. Predominant body color which is extremely pale or extremely dark is undesirable.” An auburn or mahogany may not be ideal, but this is not an automatic disqualification. It would only matter if your Golden is competing for a title. The one with a shade within the required range will be given a higher rank than the ones with extreme colors.

If you wanted a Golden with a darker shade, you might prefer to have an American Golden Retriever. This type resembles more of the hunting dogs. Their coat is more likely inherited from the Red Irish Setters and liver colored flat-coated Retrievers. English Golden Retrievers are lighter in color compared to American Goldens.

Red Goldens or Golden Retrievers with a darker shade are more popular in field trials and canine sports because of their long limbs and agility. Also, the American Golden Retrievers are said to be more active and light weight which makes them efficient in all types of sports and field work. This is in contrast to their cream colored counterpart who is more popularly known inside the show ring.

The color may vary in shades but one thing stands true, we love this breed not just because of its golden coat but because of their heart that is made of gold.

For video and reading about what Golden Retrievers get up to, and for more tips on buying a Golden Retriever, go to http://www.goldenretriever1.com/

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The Golden Retriever – A Noble Breed


The Golden Retriever – A Noble Breed
By Laurence Burrows

Who does not want to be better informed about the golden retriever breed? Known for their intelligence, friendliness, gentleness, loyalty, and willingness to work, goldens are a favorite breed for families. Their strong attributes make them great hunting dogs, guide and service dogs, and search and rescue dogs. Their distinctive golden coat gives the golden retriever a natural glow. This versatile breed is famous for its high energy and playfulness.

The golden retriever is a member of the sporting group. They are large, robust dogs which stand 20-24 inches tall at withers and weigh 55-75 pounds. The American Breed Standard calls for a coat to be any shade of gold barring coats that are too dark or too light. The British standards allow for lighter shades of gold, known as cream colors. A red or mahogany ‘gold’ color is allowable under American rules, but not under British rules. American goldens are typically taller and more slender and have a longer coat. British dogs are stockier with shorter tails and legs.

Originally, the Labrador retriever came from Newfoundland. Fishermen brought the breed to England about 1800. In the 1800’s, golden retrievers were developed in Scotland at the highland estate of Sir Dudley Marjoribanks, later Baron Tweedmouth. Golden retrievers were originally used as hunting dogs to retrieve shot game birds and waterfowl. They were bred to be great hunting dogs with water-resistant coats, an excellent sense of smell, and soft mouths that do not damage game. The breed was first arrived at by the yellow retriever crossed with a tweed water spaniel, now extinct. Afterwards, the breed was infused with black wavy-coated retrievers, Irish Setters, Bloodhounds, and the St. John’s Water Dog of Newfoundland.

A dog legendary for its gentle, friendly ways, the golden retriever doesn’t make a good watchdog; they are known for their affection for both their owners and for strangers. This breed thrives on human companionship. Goldens are energetic and active dogs. Exercising everyday is important for their health. Bred to retrieve ducks and other waterfowl, goldens love to swim. Active, and large in size, this breed is not the ideal apartment dog. Though they are adaptable, a prospective owner should live near a park and be willing to spend a lot of time with his/her dog. Otherwise, goldens need sizable backyards to be healthy. Known for their intelligence, these dogs enjoy learning tricks, playing games, retrieving and catching balls, and exercising with their owners. It is not uncommon for goldens to win obedience and agility competitions. Energetic and devoted, this breed also makes great working and service dogs. Having an excellent sense of smell, goldens have been employed in alpine search and rescue, and as police dogs for drug detection. Very active, this breed may not be the best choice of dog for the elderly. However, golden retrievers are great with children and other pets, and make a wonderful family pet.

Typically, golden retrievers can expect to live about 10-15 years. Unfortunately, bad breeding for profit has led to a number of common health problems. The most frequently encountered of these afflictions is hip dysplasia. Cataracts is another common ailment. Cancer represents the leading cause of death for goldens. To help avoid these health problems for your golden retriever, it is important to know a dog’s pedigree and to purchase dogs from a reputable breeder. Each dog should be examined by the OFA or by PennHIP. These evaluations involve x-rays to test a dog for hip dysplasia and disease. Grooming (brushing) is recommended twice a week. They may not be a good choice for those with allergies because of shedding.

Golden retrievers are an energetic and enthusiastic breed who love and crave the company of humans. These qualities along with a gentle and friendly nature make this dog wonderful for families and active people looking for a companion.

Laurence Burrows is a golden retriever lover, and trainer. For more great tips on the golden retriever breed, visit http://www.loyalgoldenretriever.com.

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Can a Golden Retriever Mix Be Better Than a Purebred Golden Retriever?


Can a Golden Retriever Mix Be Better Than a Purebred Golden Retriever?
By Archie Right

Have you ever wondered if adopting a Golden Retriever mix may be better than a purebred? There definitely may be indeed some advantages of owning a Golden Retriever mix but, as it always is, there are some pros and cons of owning a hybrid dog.

By adopting a Golden Retriever mix you may find the way around some of the problems typical for this breed. For instance Goldens shed a lot making the breed not very appropriate for allergic people. But Golden mixed with Poodle gives us Goldendoodle. This hybrid sheds very little or does not shed at all and is ideal for allergic individuals while it still preserves the best characteristics of both Poodle and Golden. But at the same time it makes grooming more complicated and demanding.

Goldendoodle is one of the many examples of Golden Retriever mixes. Goldens can be mixed with Labradors, Boxers, German Shepherds, Beagles, Irish Setters etc. And all of them have their specific traits. But things are not that simple with crossing different breeds. There are some peculiarities and disadvantages you need to be aware of if you decide to adopt or breed Golden Retriever mix.

Fist of all, hybrid dogs are normally not recognized by AKC or other major purebred registries. Some hybrids may eventually be recognized by registries in case they become very popular but normally years and even decades may pass before it happens.

Second, it is hard to achieve a steady result in the first generation. For instance, breeding purebred Golden with purebred Poodle you won’t necessary receive Goldendoodles that do not shed. Puppies within one litter may very from shedding to not shedding because they inherit traits from both parents not equally. To preserve a certain trait the dogs will have to go through careful selection process and the trait will only hold after several generations. Take it into account if you are adopting a hybrid too.

Third, you need to be very careful with the choice of the other dog for your Golden. Breeding Goldens with other canine with similar character (Labrador for instance) may enhance original characteristics of Golden Retriever like intelligence, obedience, love to people, children and pets etc. But breeding Goldens with, for instance, aggressive breeds may result in puppies with unstable character which are not fun to own at all.

Health is another issue to consider. It goes without saying that both parents must be checked for all the hereditary diseases common in their breeds. Cross breeding may be harmful between breeds that incline to the same health problems (for instance hip dysplasia is common for Golden, Labrador and Poodles) since the risk of such illnesses may increase. It is another reason for even more careful health check than usual. But to cover the full picture it is necessary to mention that there are cases when cross-breeding may positively contribute to hybrid’s health.

Finally, as with any other dog, if you’ve decided to adopt a Golden Retriever mix of some kind you should find a breeder rather than go to a pet shop. And if you’ve decided to breed your very own Golden Retriever mix you need to study both breeds carefully and be ready to invest tons of time and money in this hobby.

Archie Right is a Golden Retriever expert. For more information on Golden Retriever mix, visit http://goldenretrieverdoginfo.com/.

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RED GOLDEN RETRIEVERS : ARE THEY REALLY GOLDENS?

Red Golden Retrievers, are they really goldens? Traditional hunting dogs that Lord Tweedmouth created on his breeding program appeared more mahogany, sometimes auburn and almost red in color. But do Red Golden Retrievers really characterize the breed? 

During the 1800s, Tweed Water Spaniels were popular hunting dogs. However, they can only locate wild birds and cannot retrieve because of their small size and light coat. This is one of the main reasons why the gentlemen hunters preferred a medium sized hunting dog.

They wanted one that can retrieve fowls well in the wild and even in rough waters. Apart from extreme hunting skills, they also wanted one that looks sturdy and gorgeous at work with a coat that does not get dirty and preferably of darker shade.

From a yellow wavy coated Retriever bred with a Tweed Water Spaniel bringing four yellow pups, Tweedmouth also experimented mating the yellow colored pups to a Red Setter and black wavy-coated Retriever and liver colored flat-coated Retriever. The breeding line brought about different shades of gold, from light yellow gold to a rich and lustrous reddish brown and liver color.   

But what does the AKC Standard say about the coat? It says, “Rich, lustrous Golden of various shades. Predominant body color which is extremely pale or extremely dark is undesirable.” An auburn or mahogany may not be ideal, but this is not an automatic disqualification. It would only matter if your Golden is competing for a title. The one with a shade within the required range will be given a higher rank than the ones with extreme colors.

If you wanted a Golden with a darker shade, you might prefer to have an American Golden Retriever. This type resembles more of the hunting dogs. Their coat is more likely inherited from the Red Irish Setters and liver colored flat-coated Retrievers. English Golden Retrievers are lighter in color compared to American Goldens.

Red Goldens or Golden Retrievers with a darker shade are more popular in field trials and canine sports because of their long limbs and agility. Aside from that American Golden Retrievers are said to be more active and light weight which makes them efficient in all types of sports and field work. This is in contrast to their white counterpart who is more popularly known inside the show ring.

The color may vary in shades but one thing stands true, we love this breed not just because of its golden coat but because of their heart that is made of gold.